Showing posts with label home. Show all posts
Showing posts with label home. Show all posts

2010/02/09

Teaburi hand warmer

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Te-aburi 手あぶり - 手焙り Daruma as a Handwarmer

Before you read this story,
turn to the Hibachi brazier story as an introduction.

. Hibachi 火鉢 brazier  





. . . CLICK here for general Photos !



teaburi Daruma with Fujisan


my collection
about 24 cm high, circumference 17 cm

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. . . CLICK here for Daruma Teaburi Photos !


Te-aburi-type braziers are small portable fireplaces, which were originally transported from room to room and around them the family and guests could warm their hands and drink tea. They were made from various materials, bronze, iron, procelain, earthware or wood lined with copper.

The construction of Japanese houses was not ment to heat a room and living with nature was considered an integral part of daily life. Custom demanded that whenever a visitor arrived, the first act of hospitality would be to set a hibachi in front of him.

Ladies during the Heian period also used small te-aburi braziers to put some pieces of good smelling wood on the charcoal, place their garments over them for a while to scent the fabric before meeting with a special friend.


Te-aburi were already used in the Yayoi Period.          
パレススタイル壷を中心として、赤い土器の器種が増えていきます。
受口状口縁台付甕や鉢、手あぶり形土器などの新器種も登場し、波状紋を施す高杯も増えていきます.。
http://www.asahi-net.or.jp/~iy4t-ngc/shellhp/asahi/asapot.html




Daimyo Te-aburi  大名手あぶり
For the Lord of the Domaine

A gold lacquer Daimyo Te-aburi (handwarmer), the richly decorated lacquer stand of square form, set on four scrolling bracket feet decorated with scrolling foliage, the top with four aoi (hollyhock) mon, the Tokugawa family crest, amongst scrolling foliage and chrysanthemum flower heads. The four corners are decorated with applied metal fittings engraved with chrysanthemums and foliage, surmounted by a metal mesh fire cover with handle.



Te-aburi for on the Road
道中手あぶり Doochu Te-aburi  

This is a portable handwarmer that was used chiefly by women while traveling.
. . . CLICK here for Photos !


This "Handwarmer for the Road" reminded me of a form of body warmer I have seen in the Kashmir area of India. You carry a little basket with a metal basin holding some hot coals in front of your belly. When sitting down you swing a big coat like a poncho around the body and use the little brazier as an inside warmer.



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Daruma Te-aburi Braziers  だるま手あぶり

In the yearly magazine Nr. 4 of the Daruma Association there is a description of a pair of this kind of Daruma Hibachi in the Castle of Iwakuni. They are made of Hagi pottery (Hagiyaki) and are about 30 cm high and of white color.
You can learn more about Hagi Pottery on this HP by Robert Yellin.
http://www.e-yakimono.net/guide/html/hagi.html




Here is a fine example of a bronze handwarmer in form of Daruma
                         
Ca. 1880. Signed "Fujiwara" in katakibibori, the uneven engraving imitating brush strokes. The expressive face of Daruma is beautifully rendered in great depth and detail, and the suggestion of his robes creates a fluidity of line which is superb. There is a round bronze plate at the base of the interior which is cast in relief with scrolling vines and flowers surrounding a family crest ("mon") representing a "karahana" or "China flower." This heavy cast bronze has a rich wonderful patina that comes with age. Its function, in addition to being a work of art, is as a hibachi, one of the small personal ones known as te-aburi that were handwarmers for use by one of two persons at most. These were created to appeal to the personal tastes of their owners. The attractiveness of bronze hibachi is linked to the thickness of the metal and the quality of the casting, both of which are outstanding in this example.
Dimensions: 10",high,7" diameter at top, 10" diameter at widest part.
http://www.bandcantiques.com/items/66752/item66752store.html


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Photos from my friend Ishino


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I will show you now some handwarmers of my collection.


This is a sweet little Princess Daruma of white porcelain. The back is open to put in the hot coals on a layer of ashes. She comes decoradet with various patterns on her belly, some of this kind are also plain white. This one is 31 cm high and has a diameter of about 28 cm. A smaller sister also figures as ashtray.

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The next one is maybe of Izumo Pottery. His face is clearly modelled and the eyes are left open for the smoke to come out. So he has quite a sinister look on his face. He is 27 cm high and has a diameter of 28 cm.



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Here are two yawning Darumas in form of little handwarmers. They have a big open mouth to put in small pieces of charcoal and sometimes the inside is black with use.
あくびのだるまにも小さい手あぶりのタイプがありました。



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. Hibachi 火鉢 brazier  
with kigo


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2010/02/01

Fusuma sliding doors

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. Edo shokunin 江戸の職人 Edo craftsmen .
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Fusuma - Daruma on a Sliding Door
襖絵とだるま



Paintings of Zen Patriarchs on sliding doors
Temple Joho-Ji (Joohooji)
大雄山 正法寺  本堂正面襖絵
source : chikurin


The traditional Japanese house is a wonderful construction to adapt to the needs of its inhabitants and the changes of climate. With the use of sliding doors the four little rooms of my old farmhouse change into a big hall to entertain a lot of guests; the bedding disappears in a shelf (oshi-ire 押し入れ) closed with sliding doors and between the windows and the living room there is a small veranda which can be shut off with "sliding doors to view the moon" (tsukimi shooji 月見障子). This is a special type of doors, made of a wooden frame coverd with Japanese paper and with a glass panel at the bottom. This panel is covered with a set of smaller sliding panels which are again covered with Japanese paper and can be moved up to let you look out of the window and enjoy the autumn moon while sitting on the floor sipping ricewine. In this ingenious way the room keeps warm, outside is cold and you still can enjoy the moon.

The door type called "fusuma" is usually made of thick paper or wood panels. These large surfaces provide a superb canvas and gave rise to the most beautiful examples of the art of Japanese paintings. Pictures on Fusuma are also called "Pictures on movable walls" (shoohekiga 障壁画). Another name for fusuma is "Chinese Paper Sliding Door" (karakami shooji 唐紙障子). Fusuma are well adapted to the Japanese climate. When it is humid, they absorb moisture. On the other hand, when it is dry, they emit moisture to keep up a comfortable atmosphere.

In ancient times, Buddhist subjects formed the nucleus of Japanese paintings, but by the early 8th century, secular objects began to appear. Paintings on walls, doors and screens existed in Japan since the Nara period, but they show a strong influence of Chinese art. Truly Japanese-style paintings (yamato-e 大和絵) with motives of flowers and birds of the four seasons, court scenes and landscapes appear during the Heian period. In Japan, art was an integral part of architecture, and painting was considered of primary importance in filling the large panels and movable walls of the numerous rooms in temples, shrines, castles and mansions of the nobles and warriors.

In the late Muromachi period, the artist Kano Motonobu (Kanoo Motonobu 狩野元信1476-1559) introduced a combination of monochromatic Zen art with its strong ink brushstrokes with the more delicate lines, but vivid colors of the native Yamato-e. In the following Momoyama period his grandson, Kano Eitoku (Kanoo 狩野永徳1543-90) brought the style fo full frutition. The sliding doors and screens of this era are mostly executed on a gold foil background and they are considered the golden age of Japanese painting.

The most famous pictures on sliding doors are to be found in the great temples and mansions. The subject had to match the purpose of the room and the mood of the owner. Therefore many temples feature a Daruma picture on the sliding door, but unfortunately I could not find them on the Internet.
If someone can provide a quotation, please do so.



. Kano Eitoku 狩野 永徳 .
. Kano Motonobu 狩野元信 Kanō Motonobu .
Artist name : Kohoogen, Kohōgen こほうげん (古法眼)

. Kano Kazunobu 狩野 一信 .
1816 - 1863

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CLICK for more English illustrations
. . . CLICK here for Photos !


Fusuma, the facts at JAANUS

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Genjibusuma 源氏ふすま Genji Fusuma
a papered sliding door with a dormer


CLICK for more photos !

. Genji Monogatari  源氏物語 The Tale of Genji .

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The temple Ichijoo-In 一乗院 on Mt. Koya features with picutres of the Kanoo School (Kanoo-ha 狩野派).
襖絵は江戸時代狩野派の絵師狩野探採によって画かれたものです。

CLICK for more photos

http://www.itijyoin.or.jp/


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The famous Golden Temple Kinkaku-ji in Kyoto 金閣寺。
. . . CLICK here for Photos !


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The Rinzai Zen-Temple Zuigan-ji in Matsushima close to Sendai.
松島にある瑞巌寺(宮城県)

This long HP has many beautiful paintings.
http://www7.ocn.ne.jp/~zuiganji/oheya.html


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Temple Hootoku-ji in Iwate prefecture 宝徳寺
岩手県の宝徳寺
. . . CLICK here for Photos !

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CLICK on the thumbnails for many more photos !
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Finally, let us have a look at two of my sliding doors.
Photos TBA

They come with the following story from the painter friend:
"I was very sick a while ago and prayed a lot to get better. Now I am well again and full of gratitude. So I started to write the Heart Sutra and paint Daruma san, starting with small pictures and now doing large ones. Since you like Daruma san too, I give you some of my work for your new Daruma Hall!"

They are paintings, but we had them mounted on the sliding doors to give them more space. There is one on each side of the partition. The Chinese characters on the one with the sutra read "Heart of Buddha" (busshin 佛心), the others are a famous Zen word from the Chinese Zen Master Wu-Men (Mumon 無門).
"Every Day is a Good Day" (nichinichi kore koonichi 日々是好日).

. Every Day is a Good Day .


In Zen you do not fret about things that are over and you do not worry about things to happen in the future. Just experience the moment, be it full of pleasure or full of sorrow, do not judge its quality but experience it to the fullest. Then every day will be a "Good Day", may it be rain or storm or sunshine.
Here is a quotation to help you solve your Koan Problem.

"When you are assigned a koan by your meditation instructor, such as, "What is the sound of one hand clapping?" or "Why did Bodhidharma come from the west?" you have to ask yourself, "What does this have to do with my real suffering - my depression, my fear, or my anger?" If it does not have anything to do with these real problems, it may not be a path you need. It may be just an escape. Practice you koan in a way that your suffering is transformed". Lama Surya Das (1997) gained insight from his elderly Zen master about the use of the koan. The elderly master stated, "We all have to solve it in our own way; how we live our lives day by day and what we do depends ultimately on ourselves."
http://www.uwec.edu/greider/Buddha/Buddhism.Course/Students_Projects_Sites/larson.koan/zen_koan.htm

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Please continue to read the story about folding screens, Byobu, to learn more about art and Japanese homes.

Byoobu and Tsuitate - Daruma on a Screen 屏風, 衝立とだるま.

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. Edo shokunin 江戸の職人 Edo craftsmen .

tateguya 建具屋 making doors and sliding doors
interior finishing carpenters
They make shōji 障子, ranma 欄間 and many wooden decorations for windows and partitions.



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kigo for all winter

CLICK for more photos

. Sliding doors between the rooms, fusuma 襖 ふすま
winter doors, fuyu fusuma 冬襖
fusumagami 襖紙(ふすまがみ)washi Japanese paper for fusuma
karakami 唐紙(からかみ)special paper for sliding doors
ebusuma 絵襖(えぶすま)fusuma with paintings
shirobusuma 白襖(しろぶすま)white sliding door
fusumashooji 襖障子(ふすましょうじ)fusuma sliding doors

karakami shooji 唐紙障子(からかみしょうじ)fusuma with karakami colored paper
. . . CLICK here for Photos !


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kigo for all summer

fusuma hazusu 襖はずす (ふすまはずす )
taking the fusuma away

kazatooshi 風通し(かざとおし)"letting the wind in"
kazatoori 風通り(かざとおり) "letting the wind pass through"

Especially in the machiya merchant homes of Kyoto the preparations for summer and winter were quite necessary to keept the rooms cool in summer.


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kigo for mid-autumn

. shooji arau 障子洗う (しょうじあらう )
to wash the sliding doors
 
shooji fusuma o ireru 障子襖を入れる (しょうじふすまをいれる)
to put in sliding doors between the tatami rooms
and many more kigo.

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- quote
Edo Karakami 江戸からかみ
Hand-Made Patterned Paper for Interiors




Traditional Technologies and Techniques
There are four techniques used by the karakami craftsman:

1- Hikizome 引き染め (brush dyeing):
① Iro-gubiki 色具引き (undercoat application):
A brush that has been soaked in pigment is drawn across the paper.
② Bokashizome ぼかし染め (shade dyeing):
A single brush that includes color which has been gradated by water is drawn across the paper to create a shading effect.
③ Chojihiki 丁子引き (striped-pattern dyeing): A brush with bristles intermittently removed to achieve a comb-like effect is used to create choji (stripe) patterns on the surface of the paper.

2- Application of mica (kirabiki 雲母引き) through hand-rubbing:
Although mica is sometimes applied simply when rubbed in by hand, in most cases pigment or gold/silver paint is applied in two layers. Following rubbing in by hand, the paper is stretched out and dosa どうさ (a protective "sizing" glaze) is applied to the surface.

3- Mica pattern application using a woodblock 木版雲母摺り:
Mica 雲母(きら) and gofun 胡粉 (crushed seashells) are passed through a screen membrane onto a pattern-carved woodblock, and paper is then placed over the woodblock and rubbed gently. Gold/silver flakes are then sprinkled over the paper that has had paste applied to it, and after drying, the excess flakes are removed and a dosa glaze is applied to the surface of the paper.

There are five techniques used by the craftsman who applies decorative powders:
1- Haku-chirashi 箔散らし (flake sprinkling):
A special tube-shaped tool used for sprinkling flakes (a tube made of bamboo with strings stretched over the end), and a tool similar to chopsticks called hakuhashi 箔箸 are skillfully utilized to sprinkle gold /silver flakes over the surface of the paper.
2- Sunago-maki 砂子まき (sunago powder sprinkling):
Flakes reduced to a fine powder are inserted into a special tube-shaped tool (a tube made of bamboo with a fine mesh of copper wires over the end). The powder is repeatedly sprinkled over the surface by shaking the tube.
3- Deibiki 泥引き (paint application):
Gold/Silver paint is applied to one end of a brush, and then the brush is drawn across the paper lengthwise along a ruler with one side of the brush elevated.
4- Migakidashi 磨き出し (pattern rubbing):
A pre-patterned woodblock is placed below washi (traditional Japanese paper) that has undergone the deibiki process. The painted portions of the paper are then rubbed from above using a boar's tusk. This causes the painted portions to physically rise up.
5- Picture painting/drawing: 描絵(かきえ)
A traditional nihonga 日本画 (Japanese painting) or sumi-e 水墨画 (ink painting) is added for decorative effect.

There are two techniques used by the craftsman who does cotton printing (calico printing):
Print-type textile dyeing:
nassenzuri 捺染摺り(なっせんずり)
1- Monochrome printing: 単色摺り
Pattern paper treated with astringent persimmon juice is placed on top of washi (traditional Japanese paper) and pigment and/or dye is used to print designs.
2- Multicolor printing: 多色摺り
A number of sheets of pattern paper treated with astringent persimmon juice (5 to 7 sheets) are used to print colors one at a time until the intended design is complete.

Traditionally Used Raw Materials
Washi (traditional Japanese paper), textiles, mica, gofun (crushed seashells), pigments, dosa (sizing glaze), nikawasui paste (glue), gold flakes, adhesives (funori seaweed glue, shofunori wheat starch paste and konnyaku glue)
和紙、織物、雲母(きら)、胡粉(ごふん)、顔料、どうさ、膠水(にかわすい)、金属箔、糊・・・布海苔、正麩糊(しょうふのり)、こんにゃく糊

History and Characteristics
Edo Karakami is patterned traditional Japanese paper that is affixed to fusuma sliding doors and folding screens, etc., for decorative purposes. Woodblock printing using pre-patterned blocks, Ise-Katagami 伊勢型紙 stencil printing, hikizome brush dyeing, hand-sprinkling of sunago decorative powders 砂子手蒔き, and a wide range of other techniques are employed when making Edo Karakami.

Karakami patterned paper was introduced from China to Japan during the Heian Period (approx. 794-1185) and Japanese craftsmen subsequently imitated Chinese karakami using washi (traditional Japanese paper) as a base. Karakami was mainly produced early on in Kyoto as paper for writing waka (classical Japanese poetry).

During Japan's medieval period, people began to use karakami for decorating fusuma, hanging scrolls and the like, and during the Edo Period (1603-1868) many karakami craftsmen in Edo began to make products that could be used in such decorative roles.

In contrast to Kyo Karakami (Kyoto-style karakami 京からかみ), which focuses almost exclusively on woodblock printing, Edo Karakami is unique in its use of woodblock printing as a base along with print-type textile dyeing using patterned paper, brushwork and a variety of other techniques.

Many Edo Karakami works in the past were free-spirited and stylish, reflecting the tastes of the samurai classes and townspeople. Although some works were damaged by war or fire, craftsmen restored them on each occasion. Thus, Edo Karakami continues to provide both color and a sense of repose in people's lives even today.

Edo Karakami Cooperative Association
- source : www.sangyo-rodo.metro.tokyo.jp ...

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- quote -
Edo karakami paper is a government-designated traditional craft made by adding designs and decorations to washi, Japanese handmade paper. As the name implies, it was developed in Edo (today’s Tokyo), and reflects a townspeople’s culture established by craftsmen and merchants who worked in the city during the Edo Period (1603-1868). The craft features free and fluid designs, many depicting familiar objects and scenes from daily life at the time, as well as natural subjects that give a rich sense of the seasons.

The origins of Edo karakami can be traced back to the Heian Period (794-1185), when patterned mon-toshi paper was introduced from Tang dynasty China. This paper was used as a model for the first karakami paper, which was handmade using wooden blocks engraved with designs and decorative materials such as mica powder or gofun, a whitewash made from ground shells. At first, this paper was used as eiso – paper for transcribing poetry, such as short tanka poems or haikai linked verse – but as time passed, its use spread to wallpaper, byobu room partitions, fusuma heavy sliding doors and shoji, traditional light-weight sliding doors with translucent paper screens.



As the city of Edo grew under the Tokugawa government, both demand and uses for karakami paper expanded. As need for the paper increased, the various decorating techniques and designs of Edo karakami came into being, developing into the unique and original forms that came to distinguish the art.

There are two key traditions of Edo karakami decoration, each building off an ancient style. One is a technique that embellishes works such as Buddhist scriptures with gold and silver powders, used since the Nara (710-794) and Heian Periods (794-1185). The masterpiece of this style is known as the Heike Nokyo, a series of 33 Buddhist scrolls dedicated to Hiroshima’s Itsukushima Shrine in the hope of bringing prosperity to the Heike clan. The other technique is that of ryoshi writing paper decoration, which centers around a wooden karakami block that adds decorations to eiso paper. Its masterpiece is said to be the Nishi-Honganji Collection of Thirty-six Anthologies (Nishi-Honganji-bon Sanju-rokunin-kashu), a collection of the work of 36 waka poets assembled at the end of the Heian Period .

Today, the traditional decoration techniques of Edo karakami are still passed on even as they continue to evolve. There are many galleries that display this traditional craft in Tokyo, offering plentiful opportunities to examine its beautiful forms firsthand.
- source : japan-brand.jnto.go.jp/crafts/paper ... -

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amado 雨戸 "rain door"
exterior sliding door, to keep out the cold and rain and protect the glass windows during a typhoon.
They are traditionally made out of wood and pulled back during the daytime in a special box at the side of the house. When in place at night they have a special lock at the inside to keep burglars from opening them.

Modern plastic versions with insulation are also available.

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hikite 引き手, 引手 catch to open the fusuma door
They can be made from simple wood or highly decorated metal.



MORE samples
source : nkmr/SHIPPOU


These hikite can be works of art in themselves.



MORE samples
source : fusuma.jp/design

木瓜(もっこ)引手



CLICK for more samples !


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. Sliding Doors with Dragon paintings .

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Byoobu Tsuitate

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Byoobu and Tsuitate -
Daruma on a Screen

屏風、衝立とだるま


CLICK for more photos


. Byobu 屏風 (びょうぶ byoobu)
Folding Screen Exhibitions
 


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. Kaneda Sekijo  金田石城  .
高崎で書道家・金田石城さんの作品展
December 11, 2011 - Exhibition at Takasaki


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The context of Japanese interior was already covered in the story about sliding doors, Fusuma, so please refer to this before reading on.

. Fusuma - Daruma on a Sliding Door
襖絵とだるま



The golden age for folding screens and paravents was the Momoyama and Muromachi period. Together with the sliding door paintings they were the best medium to lavishly decorate a room and also to give expression to the painters individual taste. A folding screen set usually consists of two screens with six panels each and thus provided a large canvas, sometimes covered completely with gold foil. Chinese (too-e 唐絵) and Japanese motives (yamato-e 大和絵) where the two mainstreams of this extremely rich genre.

The word BYOOBU (byobu) originally means "Protection from the wind", so they were used to ward off drafts, but generally they were movabel walls used to partition a room for ceremonial or other occasions. The first screens were introduced from China and Korea, but soon became a thouroughly Japanese part of the interior and sometimes they were even used as presents by the Japanese envoys to the Chinese court.
The earliest screens were painted on separate panels and then hinged with leather or cloth pulled through holes at the edge of the wooden frames.

The oldest screens in Japan are kept in the imperial treasurehouse Shoosooin (Shosoin 正倉院) on the grounds of the temple Todai-ji in Nara and date from around 750 A.D. They consist of paintings on paper and silk and panels of woven fabric. While almost all early Japanese art was centered around Buddhism, the subject matter of the screens is uniquely secular and includes palast scenes, landscapes, poetry, natural themes such as animals, birds, flowers and grass or human figures.

A new Korean technique introduced in the mid-fourteenth century hinged the screen panels together with paper and offered more continuous surface on which to paint. This opportunity for new formats and changes in composition eventually brought the art of Japanes screen paintings to its zenith.

The introduction of firearms to Japan by the Portugese in the mid sixteenth century revolutionized warfare and with it, architecture, ushering in a golden age of screen painting during the Momoyama period. The monumental (and drafty) castles made necessary by the use of guns, where perfect for large, lavishly decorated screens. The liberal use of gold backgrounds not only symbolized the strenght and wealth of the new warlords but, more practically, served to reflect light and illuminate the vast, gloomy interiors.


Folding Screen, Facts by JAANUS


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tsukinami byoobu e 月並み屏風絵
tsukinami byoobu 月並屏風
Byobu with paintings of the 12 months
each with a special seasonal aspect, coming usually from waka poetry.


source : www.artelista.com
Tsukinami fuzokuzu senmen nagashi byobu
Genre scenes of the twelve months
by Kano Motonobu



. Byobu - Online Reference


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One of my favorite classical screens is the one depicting the
Gods of Wind and Thunder (fuujin raijinzu byoobu 風神雷神図屏風)
by Tawaraya Sotatsu (?-1640) from the famous old Zen temple Kennin-ji.
建仁寺の風神雷神図屏風
Tawaraya Sootatsu 俵屋宗達


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Famous screen about traditional dancers by
Tawaraya Sotatsu
俵屋宗達作の舞楽図屏風

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Ogata Koorin 尾形光琳 Ogata Korin

CLICK for more photos
White and Red Plums 紅白梅図屏風



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Autumn Grass 秋草図屏風   


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Another wild example is the amazing screen by
Soga Shohaku (1730 -81),
depicting some hermits, but with bold strokes and in vivid colors, in contrast to the hermits we will meet a little later.

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Soga Shoohaku 曾我蕭白作「群仙図屏風」

. Soga Shohaku 曽我蕭白1730–1781


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The famous screens by Ishida Yutei (Ishida Yuutei (1721-1786), featuring a group of herons on a golden background.

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石田幽汀の群鶴図


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A special genre are the folding screens with decorations of fans, called
Senmen Harimaze Byoobu (扇面貼交屏風).


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Folding screens for a wedding ceremony
Golden screens are quite popular these days.
屏風 結婚式
. . . CLICK here for Photos !


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The following folding screen brings us back to the subject of Zen.
The "Eight Drinking Hermits"
by Kaiho Yusho (Kaihoo Yuushoo 1533-1615) are close to the Zen way of life.

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飲中八仙図も禅の世界に近い屏風
海北友松(1533-1615)


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. Tokyo National Museum - Byobu Collection
屏風 - 京都国立博物館



. Byobu from the Momoyama Period
屏風 桃山絵画賛歌
 


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Daruma on a Folding Screen



source : seigetu23


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Onna Daruma - Daruma as a woman

source : tonton3

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Fotos TBA
During a trip to Nishi-Izu in 1991 I found a small temple, Hongan-ji near Dogashima, with a somehow homemade screen wiht a picture of Daruma san. It shows Daruma below the inscription "Every Day is a Good Day", which we already saw in the story about Fusuma.

“日々是好日”
西伊豆の堂ヶ島の近くにある本願寺



In the entrance of the Daruma temple Hoorin-ji in Kyoto I found these two items, a folding screen with two panels and simple screen. The big Daruma face has a real hooked nose like an Indian monk.
京都の法輪寺にこの屏風と衝立をみつけました。


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. Kigo for Winter .

portable screens, byoobu 屏風
used to keep the cold wind from reaching the body
gin byoobu, ginbyoobu 銀屏風(ぎんびょうぶ)silver folding screen





みじか夜や枕にちかき銀屏風
mijikayo ya makuramoto ni chikaki gin byoobu

short night -
near my pillow
a silver folding screen


. Yosa Buson 与謝蕪村 .


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kin byoobu, kinbyoobu 金屏風(きんびょうぶ)golden folding screen
..... kinbyoo 金屏(きんびょう)


金屏の松の古さよ冬籠り
kinbyoo no matsu no furusa yo fuyugomori

on the golden folding screen
the pine looks so old -
winter seclusion

Tr. Gabi Greve


Reclusione invernale:
sul paravento d'oro.
un pino scolorito.

Tr. Haiku del giorno


Matsuo Basho 松尾芭蕉, age 50

. . . . .


屏風には山を画書いて冬籠り
byoobu ni wa yama o egaite fuyu-gomori

on the folding screen
there is a painted mountain -
winter seclusion


Written in Genroku 2 元禄2年.
Greeting hokku for his disciple Hiranaka 平仲 in Iga, who had a splendid folding screen in his home. Basho later revised the poem to the GOLDEN SCREEN, above.


. Matsuo Basho 松尾芭蕉 - Archives of the WKD .


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金屏の羅は誰ガあきのかぜ
kinbyoo no usu mono wa taga aki no kaze

. Yosa Buson 与謝蕪村 .
in 安永五年七月二十日, 1777, on the 20th day of the 7th lunar month

maybe as a honkadori allusion to Basho

over the golden screen
who has hung her thin robes?
autumn wind

Tr. Gabi Greve


Upon the golden screens
gauze clothes are painted-- whose?
The autumn winds

Tr. Henderson


Whose thin clothes
still decorate the gold screen?
Autumn wind.

Tr. Dave Bonta


slung over a screen
a dress of silk and gauze;
autumn breeze

Tr. ?



usumono, ra 羅 thin robes, is a kigo for summer.
Golden screens were used as a formal decoration. In small format also for the Hina Doll decoration and other decorations.

On the same day Buson also wrote a haiku about fish dried on the beach in the autumn wind.

秋風や干魚かけたる浜庇

and another haiku about the golden screen
written 安永六年四月十三日 1777, on the 13th day of the fourth lunar month

金屏のかくやくとして牡丹哉
kinbyoo no kakuyaku to shite botan kana






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Tsuitate 衝立 partitioning screen
This is a standing screen consisting of a single panel supported on two feet. It is used to seperate off a corner of a room or placed in front of an open doorway to gain a little privacy or block a direct breeze.
Sometimes it contains of a simple large piece of beautiful wood and stands in the entrance of a mansion or hotel to prevent the full view of the lobby.


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From Toyama Town
source : 富山の商店街



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at Temple Tenryu-Ji 天龍寺
source : junsplace.blog


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Daruma Memorial Day Celebration, Head Priest Ito San
at temple Gokuraku-Ji 極楽寺の達磨忌
Tokyo, Ayabe Town 京都府綾部市
source : ayabebunnkazai

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source : hiroshima-art.net


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Daruma, by 高木梅荘
source : chikurindou.co.jp


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source : narun, a painter


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gachoo 画帳 - 画帖 painting collections

usually with paintings of plants, animals and poems of the 12 months

For example

kachoo waka 花鳥和歌各十二首
Twelve- Month Poem Series on Flowers and Birds
by Fujiwara no Teika 藤原定家


source : www.miho.or.jp
New Year : Bush Warbler on Willow Tree

According to his diary MEIGETSUKI 明月記:

1 first month, willow yanagi 柳 and warbler uguisu 鴬 ;
2 second month, cherry sakura 桜 and pheasant kiji 雉 ;
3 third month, wisteria (uji 藤 and skylark hibari 雲雀 ;
4 forth month, deutzia unohana 卯の花 and cuckoo hototogisu 時鳥 ;
5 fifth month, orange tachibana 橘 and water-rail kuina 水鶏 ;
6 sixth month, pinks nadeshiko 撫子 and cormorant u 鵜 ;
7 seventh month, maidenflower ominaehi 女郎花 and magpie kasasagi 鵲 ;
8 eighth month, bush-clover hagi 萩 and wild goose hatsukari 初雁 ;
9 ninth month, miscanthus susuki 薄 and quail uzura 鶉 ;
10 tenth month, chrysanthemum kiku 菊 and cranes tsuru 鶴 ;
11 eleventh month, loquat biwa 枇杷 and plovers chidori 千鳥 ; and
12 twelfth month, early plum soubai 早梅 and mandarin ducks mizutori 水鳥.
source : JAANUS


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. kai byoobu 貝屏風 folding screen with sea shells .


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2009/02/03

Air Deodorant

[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM TOP . ]

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Air Deodorant 消臭たまご
Air freshener for your home !



One in a line of TAMAGO Eggs which produce an air cleaner effect for about 1 or 2 months.
They come in different fragrance for the season.


「お部屋の消臭たまご」


- アース製薬 Earth Chemical Co. -


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Daruma Museum

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